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Sarah Banks to discuss ethical challenges in research partnerships

sarah banks
Thursday, April 24th, 2014
2:00 – 3:30 p.m.
Education/Social Work (ES) Building, Room 2126, Global Crossroads Classroom

Dr. Sarah Banks, Durham University, UK, will deliver a lecture entitled “Tackling Ethical Challenges in Community-based Participatory Research.”

Community-based participatory research (CBPR) often involves community organizations and universities working together. The work of CBPR can help build community capacity in a time of austerity, generate new perspectives on social and economic issues and result in better implementation of research findings. CBPR is growing in popularity yet, both practically and ethically challenging are present in the work of CBPR.

In the work of CBPR, it is not always clear:

  • When people are in the role of researchers and/or research subjects;
  • When people’s work should be credited and when anonymity is important;
  • Who owns and has rights to the data/findings;
  • How to navigate the institutional ethical review process;
  • How to guard against exploitation of one party by another;
  • How to be open about unequal power relationships; and
  • How to achieve greater equality and mutual respect.

During the session, Dr. Sarah Banks will discuss the types of ethical issues that arise in CBPR, the practical challenges that community organizations and universities confront when they collaborate on research projects, and useful strategies for tackling these issues in practice. Reference will be made to Community-based Participatory Research: A Guide to Ethical Principles and Practice (2012) and accompanying case materials, films, podcasts, and exercises for promoting ethical awareness, reflection and action. More information about CBPR can be found on the National Co-ordinating Centre for Public Engagement website (UK).

Register for this event here.

Co-sponsored by the IUPUI Center for Service and Learning, IUPUI Department of Anthropology, IUPUI Solution Center, IUPUI Translating Research Into Practice (TRIP), IUPUI Office of External Affairs.

Harpo Foundation 2014 emerging artists fellowship

harpo foundation

The Chicago-based Harpo Foundation was established in 2006 to support under-recognized artists. The foundation seeks to stimulate creative inquiry and encourage new modes of thinking about art.

The foundation’s Emerging Artist Fellowship at the Santa Fe Art Institute was established in 2013 to provide an annual opportunity to an emerging visual artist who is at least 25 years old and who needs time and space to explore ideas and start new projects. Artist fellows will receive a one-month residency at the Santa Fe Art Institute, which includes a well-appointed room with private bath, well-lit studio space, and a $500 travel stipend.

Founded in 1985, the Santa Fe Art Institute provides a unique opportunity for emerging artists to pursue creative projects without interruption. SFAI supports over fifty residents per year and offers a cohesive, arts-focused environment that creates the ideal working conditions for resident artists. Living and studio space is located within a nearly 17,000-square-foot complex designed by renowned Mexican architect Ricardo Legoretta. The unique SFAI environment allows residents to be as interactive or private as they wish. There are no requirements on the work produced during an artist’s time at SFAI.

One fellowship is awarded annually to an emerging artist who demonstrates strong artistic ability and promise, as well as an evolving practice at a pivotal moment in his or her development.

For complete program guidelines, information about previous fellowship recipients, and applications instructions, see the Harpo Foundation Web site.

Look/See 2014 at Herron

look see 2014
Look/See 2014
May 1, 2014
4:00 – 9:00 p.m.

Look/See 2014, Herron’s biggest night of the academic year, recognizes the achievements of Herron’s graduating master’s degree candidates with the M.F.A. Exhibition, which will fill all the galleries in Eskenazi Hall and the Eskenazi Fine Arts Center. Come celebrate with students, friends and family, faculty and guests.

The candidates, who come from nine states and represent Ceramics, Furniture Design, Painting, Photography, Printmaking and Sculpture are: Steven S. Baker, Denise Conrady, Lauren Anne Davis, Michael Helsley, Melissa Michelle Hopson, Margaret Elizabeth Ingram, Sarah Kasch, Samuel R. Ladwig, C.J. Martin, John Collins McCormick, Hillary Russell, Marna Lee Shopoff, Freeland Southard, Bridgit Stoffer, Colin Tury, Stephanie Kristen Erin Wichman, Elizabeth Wierzbicki and David Woolf.

The Annual Honors and Awards Ceremony for undergraduate students and their families kicks off the celebration at the IUPUI Campus Center, 420 University Blvd., beginning at 4:00 p.m. All are welcome.

May 1, 2014 from 5:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.:

  • School-wide open houses at Eskenazi Hall, 735 W. New York St., and Eskenazi Fine Arts Center, 1410 Indiana Ave.
  • The 2014 M.F.A. Exhibition
  • Chelsea Stillwell: Celebrating Her Artistic Life Memorial Exhibition, in the Photography Department
  • Tours of open studios
  • Food and entertainment

See the full program here.

Indiana history journal examines public art and controversy

IMH

Art, race and space fill the most recent issue of the Indiana Magazine of History. In an issue guest-edited by Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis public historian Modupe Labode, leading scholars of public art and urban life show how art can reveal fault lines in modern society.

The March 2014 issue features four articles reflecting on the artwork that prompted IUPUI’s recent symposium, “Art, Race and Space”: artist Fred Wilson’s proposed “E Pluribus Unum” sculpture, which re-imagined a new identity for the freed slave portrayed on the Soldiers and Sailors Monument in downtown Indianapolis. Wilson’s work, commissioned for the city’s Cultural Trail, was ultimately canceled after long and intense public controversy.

In her introduction to this special issue, Labode, who helped organize the original symposium, revisits the contentious history of Wilson’s proposal. She reviews the public struggles over the freedman image and its placement in the city center, and the tensions of race, class and public space discussed by symposium members. Wilson himself follows with a discussion of monuments and memorials that have inspired his work and comments on some of his installations for museums in New York City and Savannah, Ga.

Art historian Bridget Cooks looks at Wilson’s work in light of the conflicting ideals of preservation and activism. Geographers Owen Dwyer and Matthew McCourt examine the history of the Indianapolis Cultural Trail and consider the relationship of the public spaces and public art along its eight miles.

Two articles examine other public artworks that have spoken to and created public controversy outside Indiana. Art historian Renée Ater studies the public outcry that followed the commissioning by Rocky Mount, N.C., of a statue of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. Historian Erika Doss discusses a Duluth, Minn., public memorial to three young black men who were lynched in that city in 1920, arguing that such public art can “generate profound responses of renewal and reconciliation.”

The Indiana Magazine of History is published quarterly by the history department of Indiana University Bloomington. For general information on the articles or to order a copy of the issue, contact the editorial office at 812-855-4139.

IUPUI faculty and students help FBI identify cultural artifacts

larry zimmerman

Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis anthropology and museum studies faculty and students are assisting the FBI in identifying and preserving cultural artifacts found in the home of a Rush County, Ind., man.

The FBI and its multidisciplinary team are working on repatriating items of cultural patrimony.

Larry J. Zimmerman, professor of anthropology and museum studies; Holly Cusack-McVeigh, assistant professor of anthropology and museum studies; and Charmayne “Charli” Champion-Shaw, director of the Office of America Indian Programs at IUPUI, are among the art, cultural and museum experts working as consultants at the site about 35 miles southeast of Indianapolis.

“Our job is to assist the FBI in the identification of artifacts, help as liaisons with Native Americans and take care of the artifacts in keeping with best museum practices and FBI evidential procedures,” Zimmerman said. Zimmerman also holds the title of Public Scholar of Native American Representation, a shared position with the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI and the Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art.

Students and alumni of museum studies classes taught by Cusack-McVeigh, also Public Scholar of Collections and Community Curation, are helping to handle the artifacts as they are registered, photographed and packaged.

The IUPUI faculty and students participated in an FBI briefing April 1 and a press conference April 2 about the matter. At this time, the IUPUI professors and students are not available for additional media interviews.

2014 Smith Richardson fellowship on international and foreign studies

smith richardson

Dearline: June 15, 2014.

The Smith Richardson Foundation is pleased to announce its annual Strategy and Policy Fellows grant competition to support young scholars and policy thinkers on American foreign policy, international relations, international security, military policy, and diplomatic and military history.

The purpose of the program is to strengthen the U.S. community of scholars and researchers conducting policy analysis in these fields.

The Foundation will award at least three research grants of $60,000 each to enable the recipients to research and write a book. Within the academic community, this program supports junior or adjunct faculty, research associates, and post-docs who are engaged in policy-relevant research and writing. Within the think tank community, the program supports members of the rising generation of policy thinkers who are focused on U.S. strategic and foreign policy issues.

Applicants must be an employee or affiliate of either an academic institution or a think tank.

Please note that the Fellowship program will only consider single-author book projects. It will not consider collaborative projects (e.g., edited or multi-author books, conference volumes or reports, or a collection of previously published articles, chapters or essays.)

For information regarding the application procedure and the required proposal format, please e-mail: strategyfellows@srf.org

Smith Richardson Foundation, Inc.

60 Jesup Road

Westport, CT 06880

 

2014 Italian Film Festival schedule announced

italian film fest 2014

The Italian program in the Department of World Languages and Cultures at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis will host the Italian Film Festival, April 12 through May 10. The festival showcases nine films, including two documentaries.

“Once again the program in Italian brings a taste of Europe to IUPUI and Indianapolis with this year’s edition of the Italian Film Festival, showing the best in recent Italian filmmaking,” said professor Marta Anton, chair of the Department of World Languages and Cultures, part of the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI.

Indianapolis is one of 11 cities participating in the festival. All films will be presented with English subtitles and are free and open to the public. The Indianapolis series is sponsored by Fiat and the Italian Cultural Institute of Chicago in collaboration with IUPUI and the IUPUI Italian Club.

The films will be shown at either the Lilly Auditorium of the IUPUI University Library, 755 W. Michigan St., or the IUPUI Campus Center Theatre, 420 University Blvd.

The films, times and locations are:

  • “Viva L’Italia,” 2 p.m. Saturday, April 12, IUPUI University Library, Lilly Auditorium. A sudden illness results in politician Michele Spagnolo saying anything that comes into his head and doing whatever he wants, with hilarious consequences. (Comedy, 111 min)
  • “Gli Equilibristi” (“Balancing Act”), 4 p.m. Sunday, April 13, Lilly Auditorium. A critical error causes Giulio’s life to unravel. Through a series of events, Giulio discovers how thin the line truly is between well-being and poverty. (Comedy, 100 min)
  • “Bianca Come Il Latte, Rossa Come Il Sangue” (“White as Milk, Red as Blood”), 2 p.m. Saturday, April 19, Lilly Auditorium. Leo is a typical 16-year-old who finds school agonizing. Then, a new teacher encourages him to follow his dreams, which include an unattainable fellow student with fiery red hair. (Drama, 102 min)
  • “Viva La Liberta” (“Long Live Freedom”), 7 p.m. Friday, April 25, IUPUI Campus Center Theatre. When the leader of a political opposition party disappears, his wife and assistant turn to his identical twin brother, who was recently released from a psychiatric hospital. Will anyone notice the switch? (Drama, 93 min)
  • “Il Rosso E Il Blue” (“The Red and Blue”), 4 p.m. Sunday, April 27, Lilly Auditorium. Set in a Roman school are the stories of an art history professor who has lost his passion for the job, a young substitute who is trying to save a rebel student and a stern head mistress who is forced to deal with a student who has been forgotten by his mother. (Comedy, 98 min)
  • “Teorema Venezia” (“The Venice Syndrome”), 7 p.m. Saturday, May 3, Campus Center Theatre. Venice, the world’s most beautiful city, has 48,000 residents, and there are fewer every year as the city is becoming almost uninhabitable. The film shows what remains of Venetian life. (Documentary, 80 min)
  • “La Migliore Offerta” (“The Best Offer”), 7 p.m. Friday, May 9, Campus Center Theatre. An antiques expert is appointed to oversee the sale of a beautiful heiress’s priceless art collection and is soon engulfed by a passion that rocks his bland existence. (Drama, 124 min.)
  • “Women Workers’ War,” 5 p.m. Saturday, May 10, Campus Center Theatre. A documentary about two women: one who leads the longest factory sit-in by women in Italy, the other who operates a cookie factory that also encourages cultural and personal growth among the workers. (Documentary, 54 min)
  • “Il Gioellino” (“The Jewel”), 7 p.m. Saturday, May 10, Campus Center Theatre. The founder of an international conglomerate places his closest relatives and trusted managers in key positions, but they are unfit to face the challenges of today’s market. (Drama, 110 min)

For more information, view the event flyer or contact professor Cristiana Thielmann at 310-989-2810 orcthielma@iupui.edu.

Former ACLS President to discuss nature of philanthropy

stan katz
Thursday, April 17, 2014; 12:00 – 1:15 p.m.
Sigma Theta Tau Boardroom at Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy, 550 W. North St., Indianapolis, IN

Free and open to the public.

Dr. Stanley Katz, President Emeritus of the American Council of Learned Societies, and National Humanities Medal Recipient (2010), will deliver a talk entitled “Philanthropy and Plutocracy: Is Bill Gates Different than Andrew Carnegie?”

Katz is President Emeritus of the American Council of Learned Societies, the national humanities organization in the United States. Mr. Katz graduated magna cum laude from Harvard University in 1955 with a major in English History and Literature. He was trained in British and American history at Harvard (PhD, 1961), where he also attended Law School in 1969-70. His recent research focuses upon the relationship of civil society and constitutionalism to democracy, and upon the relationship of the United States to the international human rights regime. He is the Editor in Chief of the recently published Oxford International Encyclopedia of Legal History, and the Editor of the Oliver Wendell Holmes Devise History of the United States Supreme Court. He also writes about higher education policy, and publishes a blog for the Chronicle of Higher Education.

Formerly Class of 1921 Bicentennial Professor of the History of American Law and Liberty at Princeton University, Katz is a specialist on American legal and constitutional history, and on philanthropy and non-profit institutions. The author and editor of numerous books and articles, Mr. Katz has served as President of the Organization of American Historians and the American Society for Legal History and as Vice President of the Research Division of the American Historical Association. He is a member of the Board of Trustees of the Newberry Library and numerous other institutions. Katz is a member of the New Jersey Council for the Humanities, the American Antiquarian Society, the American Philosophical Society; a Fellow of the American Society for Legal History, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the Society of American Historians; and a Corresponding Member of the Massachusetts Historical Society.

Please RSVP to nbell@iupui.edu

For further details, please visit the event page at the School of Philanthropy’s website.

Humanities Intensive Learning and Teaching workshops

hilt logo

The Humanities Intensive Teaching and Learning (HILT) Institute will be held August 4-8, 2014 on the campus of the University of Maryland. We’ve got an exciting slate of classes taught by incredible instructors. Courses for 2014 include:

  • Project Development led by Simon Appleford, Clemson University and Jennifer Guiliano, MITH
  • Introduction to Web Development, Design, and Principles led by Jeremy Boggs, Scholars’ Lab, and Jeri Wierenga, George Mason University
  • Humanities Programming led by Wayne Graham, Scholars’ Lab, and Brandon Walsh, University of Virginia
  • Games in the Humanities Classroom led by Anastasia Salter, University of Baltimore
  • Large-Scale Text Analysis with R led by Matt Jockers, University of Nebraska
  • Network Analysis and Visualization led by Elijah Meeks, Stanford University
  • Born-Digital Forensics led by Kam Woods, University of North Carolina, and Porter Olsen, MITH
  • Crowdsourcing Cultural Heritage led by Ben Brumfield, Independent Developer, and Mia Ridge, Ph.D. Candidate, Open University
  • Critical Race and Gender in the Digital Humanities led by Jarah Moesh, Ph.D. Candidate, University of Maryland

The costs to attend HILT are: Non-student/Regular: $950 Student: $500 Group discounts are available by contacting dhinstitute@umd.edu

The Keynote Speaker for Humanities Intensive Learning + Teaching 2014 will be Tara McPherson. Tara McPherson is Associate Professor of Critical Studies at the University of Southern California’s School of Cinematic Arts. She is a core faculty member of the IMAP program, USC’s innovative practice based-Ph.D., and also an affiliated faculty member in the American Studies and Ethnicity Department. For more information on the Humanities Intensive  Learning and Teaching Institute, please visit the HILT website.

2014 Tobias Leadership Conference

tobias conf

Indiana University’s ninth annual Tobias Leadership Conference will take place from April 24-26 at the Alexander Hotel in downtown Indianapolis. The Conference brings together scholars and practitioners from the entire spectrum of leadership including corporate leadership, not-for-profit leadership, religious leadership, educational leadership, medical leadership, and political leadership. The Conference will feature papers, panels, and speakers from all academic disciplines. The registration fee of $195 includes all conference sessions, the Thursday evening reception and book fair, two lunches, Friday’s gala dinner, and two continental breakfasts. There is a $45 student rate that does not include meals. Plenary speakers include:

  • Data-Smart Leadership – Stephen Goldsmith, Professor of Government, Director of Data-Smart City Solutions at Harvard Kennedy School
  • Frankenstein’s Leadership Monster – Richard Gunderman, Chancellor’s Professor, Professor of Radiology, Pediatrics, Medical Education, Philosphy, Liberal Arts, Philanthropy, and in the Honors College at Indiana University
  • Spirituality and Leadership Effectiveness – George Houston, Center for Creative Leadership
  • Effective Leadership in Japan, the Case of Shibusawa Eiichi – Gil Latz, Associate Vice Chancellor for International Affairs, Professor of Geography and Philanthropy, IUPUI
  • A Conversation with Russ Mawby, 25 year CEO and Chairman Emeritus of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation – Russ Mawby and Gene Tempel, Founding Dean, Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy
  • Put Your Whole Self in: Leadership Beyond the Rules – Sandy Eisenberg Sasso, Rabbi Emerita, Director, Religion, Spirituality and the Arts Initiative, Butler University
  • Why Culture Matters – Jeff Smulyan, Chairman of the Board, President and CEO, Emmis Communications
  • Made for Each Other: Leading with Collaboration and Creativity – Jim Walker, Executive Director, Big Car Collaborative
  • Responsible Leadership: Stewardship for the Future – Sandra Waddock, Gilligan Chair of Strategy, Carroll School of Business, Boston College
  • Changing Minds in the Army: Why it is so Difficult and What to do About It – Leonard Wong, Research Professor, United States Army War College

To register, and to view the entire Conference program, please visit the conference website.